Grandfather Your Section-181 Benefit Now

Section §181 expires at the end of 2011. If you grandfather it correctly, then your film or series (up to 44 episodes!) will remain eligible for the benefits indefinitely.

[Read More]

Hallelujah! Gmail’s new Priority Inbox fights email overload.

by Jeff Steele

It is nothing short of mind numbing how much email flies around during film closings.  Executive teams representing senior banks, mezz lenders, tax credit lenders, equity financiers, bond companies, producers, and talent, along with their in-house and out-house lawyer teams and other reps have taken email’s “Reply to All” to unimagined and unmanageable extremes.  Double that if it’s a bilateral treaty co-production, triple it if there are three countries.  I was averaging 300+ emails per day in my last closing, spanning three continents – the sun never set on my inbox.  In addition, there are production related issues and other projects mixed in with the rest.  The good news is that none of it was spam; the bad news is that none of it was spam.  If it’s not junk, but it’s also not important, then it’s bologna (or bacn).

So now the enemy has a name, but how does one separate the wheat from the chaff?  Google’s Gmail has the answer in their new Priority Inbox feature.

According to Google, “Priority Inbox is like your personal assistant, helping you focus on the messages that matter without requiring you to setup complex rules.  It splits your inbox into three sections: “Important and unread”, “Starred”, and “Everything Else”.

“Gmail uses a variety of signals to predict which messages are important, including the people you email most, and which messages you open and reply to (these are likely more important that the ones you skip over.”  In addition, you can train the program by clicking on “+” or “–“ to indicate important vs. unimportant emails.

Until Microsoft Outlook can do this, I think I will have to use Gmail for my closings.  Life’s too short for anything less. 

Gmail Priority Inbox video

One Response leave one →
  1. Scott Hillman permalink
    October 10, 2010

    Ahh. I would never do that.

    I have Yahoo and Just Spam Filters.

    However two or three times a year, an email that isn’t spam is called spam-sometimes and usually in fact one that is very important. filters tend to think any mention of money in my experience is Spam-which makes a little sence but…\

    Just last week a message dealing with my film closing i found between adds between cheap watches and i belive home security ads.

    This is why i check my spam folder probabbly about once a day.

    and why in fact it is completly usless…As i suspect the gmail features if your honest. You can’t train it enough to every be a 100 percent reliable and i think especially in film closing one can’t make to many mistakes here.

    GD Star Rating
    loading...
    GD Star Rating
    loading...

Leave a Reply

Note: You can use basic XHTML in your comments. Your email address will never be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS